Still undecided about a major? Considering a gap year before starting college? Start here to learn more about different career options and salaries or take an online personality test to discover your best "career fit."

    GenTX
  • Personality Testing
  • HumanMetrics
  • www.humanmetrics.com
  • Complete a typology test. Write down the combined 4 letter type (in large purple font on the results page). Each letter represents a trait. Note the strength of preference % below it. The lower the number the closer you are to the opposing trait. Examine site links on the results page for personality type descriptors, potential careers, and find out what famous personalities you resemble.

    Supporting sites:
    Keirsey.com
    Plug in the 4 letter traits as determined from the Metrics site for more information on temperament groups (trait groupings). Use this site to compare your results to the tendencies of other temperaments. A Jung/ Briggs personality test is also available on this site, but disclosure of only 2 of the 4 letter types is free. Certain reports can be purchased if you choose.

    Typelogic.com
    Provides more detailed and technical explanations of the 4 letter types and all 16 trait type groupings. Compare your results to the other descriptions listed. Are they accurate – or are you more of one than the other? Remember: You may need to adjust the findings or letter types yourself.
  • CareerPath
  • CareerPath
  • www.careerpath.com
  • Take some of the recommended tests on the Career Tests page. On one test all you need to do is pick colors. There was a $20 charge for half of the results, but the free half was still helpful. You may have to create an account to get access to all of the data.
  • North Carolina Career Resource Network
  • www.soicc.state.nc.us/soicc/planning/c1a.htm
  • Holland Occupational Themes - Based on the theory of John Holland, Ph.D., people with the same or similar interests are often found in the same work environments. To discover the work environments suited to your interests, abilities, and personality, consider the following categories/themes. Check the appropriate boxes on this 2-page form to find your themes.
  • Lifelong Learner Career Center
  • www.learnlink.org/
  • Click on “High School”, then on “Assessments”, then finally on “Hue Are You”.

    Complete the test as instructed. Rank the word groups as best as you can. At the end you will be designated as 2 color types. Remember them. In the top two colored boxes that you resemble click on the highlighted word “you” to see a description of that personality type. Then in the upper right corner click on that color’s “careers” link to see jobs you may be suited for. Clicking on job titles will give you a brief background on each.

    Now go back to the Assessment Center where you chose “Hue are You” and click on “Discover your Career Strengths”. Complete the YES/NO questions and hit Enter. Note the highest three scoring traits and descriptions (This is your Holland RIASEC Code).

    Take the 1st letter of these top 3 traits and go to: www.careerplanner.com/JobDescSearchTool.cfm Insert the 3 RIASEC letters into item #1 of the “Job Description Search Tool”. This lists potential careers for that code type. Since no one is just one type rearrange the 3 letters for more job possibilities. Google “Holland Code & careers” to get more jobs using those letters. Try items # 2 & 3 on the page.
  • Education Planner.org
  • Education Planner.org
  • www.educationplanner.com/students/index.shtml
  • Pay particular attention to the “Career Planning” and Self-Assessments (especially What's Your Learning Style?, Career Clusters & Which Careers Match Your Skills? in the latter) sections.
  • O*Net Resource Center
  • www.onetcenter.org/tools.html
  • The Occupational Information Network (O*NET), developed by the US Department of Labor, is the nation's primary source of occupational data. Information from this database forms the heart of O*NET OnLine, an interactive application for exploring and searching occupations. The site provides “Career Exploration Tools” that help individuals identify work-related interests, what they consider important on the job, and the attributes and abilities needed to fill the 800 occupations listed. Users may link to occupational information in CareerOneStop. This allows a seamless transition from assessing their interests, work values, and abilities to matching their job skills with the requirements of occupations in their local labor market.
  • CareerOneStop
  • CareerOneStop: Skills Profiler
  • www.careerinfonet.org/skills
  • Use the Skills Profiler to create a list of your skills and match them to job types that use those skills. It takes about 20 minutes to complete a skills profile. Then it can be saved or printed out. Learn more about the Skills Profiler and how it works or see an example of a skills profile. If you want to see how your skills from a current or past job can lead you into a new career, visit mySkills myFuture. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required.
  • Search Assistance, Careers & Salaries
  • Search Assistance
  • Going2College.org
  • http://going2college.org
  • There are hundreds of careers for you to explore and many involve education and training requirements. The more you can develop your career goals, the better focused you'll be for steps to take in high school and after graduation. Follow your skills and interests to find a career that's right for you and then learn about what you need to pursue that occupation. There are links to sites that will match skills and interests to potential career paths and then even more sites to help explore those career options.
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • www.bls.gov
  • Before you choose a career, it helps to learn more about all of your available options. The Occupational Outlook Handbook, updated annually by the U.S. Department of Labor, provides a detailed look at every type of career with information on: the nature of the work, working conditions, training, qualifications and advancement, employment, job outlook, earnings / average starting salaries, sources of additional information.
  • CareerOneStop (US Dept. of Labor)
  • www.careeronestop.org
  • If you need anything career related this is the place and site navigation is very easy. This section is dedicated to students and career advisors with areas dedicated to: career exploration, benefits, training, job searches, internships and future trends. There’s even info on green careers.
  • O-Net OnLine
  • O-Net OnLine
  • www.onetonline.org
  • The Occupational Information Network (O*NET), developed by the US Department of Labor, is your tool for career exploration and job analysis. O*NET OnLine has detailed descriptions of the world of work for use by job seekers, workforce development and HR professionals, students and researchers. Browse groups of similar occupations to explore careers. Choose from industry, field of work, science area, and more.

    Companion Sites:
    My Next Move
    “What do you want to do for a living” – Searches by key words, industry and Q&A.

    CareerShip: Mapping Your Future
    CareerShip® is a career exploration site for middle and high school students, so it’s simpler to use. It uses O*NET Career Exploration Tools. Students can review careers by cluster, read about the featured career, match careers to their interests, or search for a particular career.
  • CareerCruising.com
  • www.careercruising.com
  • Career Cruising is an on-line career guidance and planning system used in Arlington ISD. The software assists students to find the right career, explore education and training options, and to prepare for the SAT/ACT. Assessment tools show how your skills and abilities match up to those used in the careers that interest you. Discover how you learn and retain information to find tips on how to improve study habits to suit your learning style.
  • The Work Buzz
  • The Work Buzz
  • www.theworkbuzz.com
  • Work Buzz readers can find out what “the buzz” is on career-related topics. You can also find ideas and tools to help you be a rock star at finding that perfect job! Our content focuses on topics of interest to our job seekers, and includes summaries of trends in the workplace as well as tips and resources on a number of topics.
  • WorkInTexas.com: Helping Texans Work Better
  • www.twc.state.tx.us/jobs/job.html
  • WorkInTexas.com is a comprehensive online job search resource and matching system developed and maintained by the Texas Workforce Commission. It provides recruiting assistance to Texas employers of all types and sizes, and job search assistance to any individual seeking work in Texas.
  • Today’s Military
  • Careers
  • Today’s Military
  • www.todaysmilitary.com
  • The Today’s Military website is produced by the United States Department of Defense. This site is not intended as a recruiting tool for any branch of the U.S. Military. Rather, it was developed as a resource for parents, educators and young adults curious about military service.
  • Federal Job Opportunities & Loan Forgiveness
  • www.makingthedifference.org
  • Your source for federal jobs and internships. This site tells you where to find them and how to get them. Federal employees are eligible to receive up to $60,000 ($10,000 a year) from participating agencies in this program towards the repayment of their educational loans. This program requires a three year commitment to the agency/department that provided the repayment.
  • Salaries
  • Reality Check - Careers
  • www.cdr.state.tx.us/realitycheck/
  • The state web site that connects lifestyle choices with the salaries required to fund them. Users select the Texas city in which they live and answer questions about desired housing, clothing, entertainment and other personal aspects. An annual income is then calculated based on those answers for the salary required to live in that fashion. Jobs that pay that income are also shown.
  • Salary Wizard (USNews.com)
  • http://usnews.salary.com/salarywizard/
  • Site offers 3 calculating tools to determine job salary ranges by zip code, area cost of living estimates and assessing job appropriateness. The Salary Wizard is a free basic report that shows national average salaries adjusted by location. Get personalized answers with a Personal Salary Preview (a free, emailed look at the effect of your personal traits) and a premium Personal Salary Report for the ultimate salary negotiation tool.
  • Glassdoor.com
  • Glassdoor.com
  • www.glassdoor.com
  • Glassdoor is a free inside look at jobs and companies. Salary details, company reviews, and interview questions — all posted anonymously by employees and job seekers. Requires the creation of a free personal account.
  • Kiplinger’s Tax Withholding Calculator
  • www.kiplinger.com/tools/withholding/
  • Easy-to-Use Tax Withholding Calculator - Most Americans have too much taken from their pay checks each year. Why let the IRS hold your money interest-free? If you received or will receive a refund this year, use this calculator to see how much you can add back to your paycheck...starting next pay day.
  • Resumes & Cover Letters
  • All of the websites listed here have thorough job/career search pages. Topics include: writing resumes, cover letters and thank you letters; finding jobs; handling difficult interview questions; various calculators and countless assorted articles. Job hunting can be a tedious, frustrating and complex process. Seek out support and advice from others more experienced and most of all – remember to follow-up on those applications. Don’t just wait for the telephone to ring.

    About.com - Job Searching
    AIE – Finding a Career
    MSN Careers with CareerBuilder.com